The Best Medicare Supplement (Medigap) Plans in Oregon

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  • Oregon Medicare Supplement (Medigap) plans make it easier to pay for out-of-pocket Medicare costs, including copays and deductibles. Read our review of Medigap plans in Oregon to learn more about your supplemental insurance options.

The Original Medicare program consists of both Part A and Part B coverage. Medicare Part A covers inpatient services, such as surgical procedures and care provided by a nurse while you're in the hospital, and Part B covers many of the services you receive on an outpatient basis, such as visits with a general practitioner and tests needed to diagnose acute and chronic medical conditions. Although Original Medicare is much more affordable than private health insurance, it doesn't cover all services fully, leaving you to pay copays, deductibles and other out-of-pocket costs. Medicare Supplement Insurance (Medigap) makes these costs more manageable by paying a certain percentage of the balance remaining after Medicare has paid its share of the bill.

Although Medigap makes having Medicare much more affordable, many Oregon residents haven't signed up for Medicare Supplement Insurance. In 2018, only 158,188 people enrolled in Oregon's Original Medicare program had purchased Medigap coverage. That's just 30.6% of the state's Original Medicare beneficiaries. If you're on Original Medicare and don't have Medicare Supplement Insurance, start with the research below to learn more about what plans are available in Oregon.

You can find Medicare Supplement plans where you live by comparing plans from several different insurance companies online.

What Are the Best Oregon Medicare Supplement Plans?

Oregon has 10 Medicare Supplement Insurance plans available. Unlike your Original Medicare coverage, these plans aren't administered by the federal government. Each plan is sold by a private insurance company that sells supplemental insurance to Oregon residents. The chart below lists the plans and breaks them down according to the benefits they offer. 

No matter which Oregon Medigap plan you choose, you'll get an extra 365 days of hospital coverage in addition to what's included in your Original Medicare plan. All Medigap plans also cover your Part A coinsurance. Although every plan provides some coverage for Part B copays and coinsurance, not all of them cover these out-of-pocket costs completely. You may even be able to purchase a plan that pays some of the coinsurance for skilled nursing care or covers your Part B deductible.

In almost every state, Medigap plans are standardized the same way, so it's easy to compare costs and coverage levels. Plans F, G and N tend to be the most popular, with many Medicare enrollees choosing Plans F and G for their low premiums and Plan N for its high level of coverage. Plan F isn't available to anyone who became eligible for Original Medicare after January 1, 2020, however.

Although Plan N costs a little more than other Oregon Medigap plans, it covers 100% of most Medicare copays. If you need emergency care, you may have to pay a copay of $50, but that's much less than you would pay if you didn't have Medigap coverage.

How Do I Enroll in an Oregon Medigap Plan?

If you sign up for both parts of Original Medicare when you turn 65, you'll have a Medigap open enrollment period that starts the same month as your 65th birthday. It's best to sign up for Medigap during this period because you'll have unlimited access to every plan.

During your Medigap open enrollment period, insurance companies can't deny your application because you have a pre-existing condition, and they can't charge you a higher premium than a healthy individual due to your medical history. This is known as guaranteed issue rights. Once your initial Medigap enrollment period ends, insurance companies can start using a process known as underwriting to determine if they should charge you more or turn down your application completely. It's important to be aware of the exceptions to these rules.

  • If you have a pre-existing condition, your Medigap provider may be able to impose a six-month waiting period before it starts paying any expenses related to that condition.
  • If you've had other health coverage for at least six months and that plan has been covering your pre-existing condition, you may be able to get Medigap coverage without any waiting periods.
  • If you have group health insurance or some other type of health coverage after you turn 65, your initial Medigap open enrollment period won't start until the month you sign up for Medicare Part B; this assumes that your previous coverage will be terminated during the same month.
  • You may retain your guaranteed issue rights under certain circumstances. For example, if you lose your Medigap coverage through no fault of your own, you may be able to purchase an Oregon Medigap plan outside the initial enrollment period without paying more for coverage or getting denied based on your medical history.
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