Medicare in New Hampshire

In this article...
  • Do you need to enroll in Medicare and when do you become eligible? Find out more in this guide to Medicare in New Hampshire, which lays out your options.

What New Hampshire Medicare Plans Are Available?

Residents of New Hampshire who are eligible for Medicare can choose from several types of coverage. This is because Medicare breaks down its coverage into parts and offers the chance for individuals to choose a privately administrated version of the coverage. If you're looking at Medicare in New Hampshire, here are the options you'll need to consider:

  • Part A. Medicare Part A is one part of what's sometimes referred to as Original Medicare. Part A covers inpatient hospitalization and some other services, such as stays in a skilled nursing unit. For those who worked at least 10 years and paid enough through the Social Security program, Medicare Part A is typically free, which means you won't need to pay premiums for it. If you didn't pay enough through Social Security and aren't entitled to Medicare Part A through your spouse's benefits, you may need to pay for this service.
  • Part B. Medicare Part B is the other half of the Original Medicare Program. Part B is what covers outpatient services, such as visits to your doctor's office and lab and imaging work. It also covers some medical equipment, such as wheelchairs, diabetic testing supplies and orthotics, if they're deemed medically necessary. Typically, you do pay a monthly premium for Part B. How much you pay depends on your income; the premiums are typically taken out of your Social Security benefits, so you don't actually have to remember to pay a bill.

  • Part C. This is also referred to as a Medicare Advantage Plan. Part C plans are something you can choose in lieu of Part A and B. They are HMO or PPO plans that are administered by private insurance organizations such as Humana, though ultimately they're paid for by the federal government. Part C plans have to cover everything Parts A and B do, but they can also cover other things. They also may come with a monthly premium and other types of deductibles. When considering whether you should choose Original Medicare or a Part C plan, think about your own health needs and which type of plan may cover more of what you need.
  • Part D. Part D is the Medicare prescription drug benefit. This is something you can add on to Original Medicare or a Part C plan to help you cover the costs of prescriptions. You do pay a premium for this coverage. If you opt for Part C, check that your plan doesn't already include prescription coverage, as some do.
  • Medicare Supplement Insurance. This is a private insurance plan you may be able to purchase to help you cover the costs of what Medicare doesn't. Part B Medicare, for example, comes with a small annual deductible and 20% copays. A supplemental insurance can cover those costs for you. If you have a low income, you may be able to get New Hampshire Medicaid as your supplement; otherwise, you may want to consider purchasing a plan to cut down on medical expenses in the future. 

As of 2020, 305,150 residents of New Hampshire were covered by Medicare plans. The bulk of those — 241,480 — were covered under Original Medicare. The rest — 63,670 — had chosen Medicare Advantage plans.

Who Is Eligible for New Hampshire Medicare?

Residents in Medicare who have reached retirement age or those who have certain disabilities are eligible for Medicare. You may be automatically enrolled in Medicare or need to sign up for it.

If you're getting benefits from Social Security or the Railroad Retirement Board at least 4 months before you turn 65, you'll be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B the first day of the month during which you turn 65. About 3 months before this, you'll get a Medicare card in the mail along with information about how you can change your enrollment choices if you choose to.

This also kicks off what's called your initial enrollment period, or IEP. During this time, which lasts from 4 months before you turn 65 to 3 months after, you can change your enrollment to choose a Medicare Advantage plan or choose whether or not to enroll in Part B or D.

If you're not automatically enrolled during this time, you will need to reach out to Medicare or the Social Security office to do so. You'll also have the chance to change your enrollment elections or enroll in the program if you missed enrollment. During open enrollment, which runs from October 15 to December 7 each year, you can switch, join or drop your plan. If you're enrolled in a Medicare Advantage plan, you can choose to change that plan or switch to Original Medicare from January 1 to March 31 — though this only works once during each year. 

How Do I Enroll in Medicare in New Hampshire

You can apply for Medicare online. You can also call or visit your local Social Security office for assistance in applying for Medicare or contact an agency that helps with Medicare Enrollment, such as Health Apply in Manchester.

Contact Information for New Hampshire Medicare, Medicaid and Insurance Help

 

  • Get information about New Hampshire Medicaid to find out if you're available for this benefit. Medicaid pays secondary to Medicare if you have both coverages and can help reduce the total amount you have to pay for your medical expenses. 
  • Learn more about insurance assistance options in the state via the New Hampshire SHIP center. You can also call the office at 866-634-9412.
  • Find out how to save money on prescription drugs with the New Hampshire RX Card.
  • Read more about Medicare in New Hampshire from the New Hampshire Insurance Department.